Wildlife Garden Design Guide-Episode 1-Planning the Garden

The award-winning garden ninja Lee Burkhill shows you how to design a wildlife garden. This series of wild animal garden videos will record the progress of his next project, turning a blank canvas into a wildlife-friendly garden. #wildlife #gardening #gardendesign #vlogger #gardenanswerWant to find out the tips and tricks I use in my garden? Then, watch this guide and subscribe to my YouTube channel to get more garden design tips, tricks and tricks! Why not visit my blog to get hundreds of gardening guides? www.gardenninja.co.uk is hosted by Garden Ninja of Manchester garden designer and blogger Lee Burkhill. He is the RHS award-winning Chelsea Garden Designer and a member of the BBC Radio Manchester’s Saturday Morning Garden Call Expert Panel. Why not subscribe to my YouTube channel? Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: Blog: https: www.gardenninja.co.uk.

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11 Comments

  • John Walker
    Reply

    I've been subscribed for a while, but over the last few days I've decided to re-wild the scrappy lawn (approx 1500 sq metres).
    I'm actually in the south of France, the summers are long and scorching and the winters are usually wet with occasional sub-zero.
    So, I'll be following this project with great interest.

  • Pinecone Defense
    Reply

    Really looking forward to seeing how this develops! I don't think Doulgas Fir is native to the UK though. I grew up in the Pacific NW of the US which is their native range and they grow to be absolutely massive!. You'll have a truly impressive tree given your space. Cheers.

  • Melanie Gamble
    Reply

    I’m addicted to your videos. Wish you were closer, My plan is to turn my ‘new house’ turned back garden into a productive edible garden with a natural area to encourage wildlife.

  • Vivien Arnold
    Reply

    Really looking forward to following this project. I would love to know your reasons for choosing which trees. I have got a wildlife section in my garden with 8 trees, 3 of them mature oaks and one scots pine. The rest are arbutus and ornamental cherries. Unfortunately I have a large infestation of bramble at the moment I am trying to deal with because of a lack of attention for a few years.

  • Sue Bradford
    Reply

    Can't wait for the next instalment Lee! In comparison to your acreage, I have a pocket handkerchief!! I recently had a lovely Philadelphus which I'd had for about 30 years, die off. I was sawing down the stumps as far as I could but noticed a honeysuckle has taken root below it. So the stumps are about 4 ft high and ready to accommodate the honeysuckle. Take care and keep safe Lee.

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