Small garden design ideas in the budget-tips from top garden designers!

If you want to beautify your backyard or garden within your budget, then here are the best garden design tips and ideas from leading garden designers. Learn how to save money and still get the garden you like! The gardening designer is: Arit Anderson: www.aritanderson.com Charlotte Rowe Adam Frost Mark Lane Jane Beedle Francine Raymond Monty Don’s best book on gardening design (Note: I am a member of Amazon, so I earn from eligible purchases For a small fee, I only recommend what I really like!) Monty Don’s Down to Earth (about how to create a garden, not strictly about how to design a garden. This is an easy-to-read way to become a better gardener. Design It’s a comprehensive guide to everything you need to know about garden design: as well as “Thinking Gardener” by top garden designer Ginny Blom (a good book, it provides insights into how garden design professionals approach the new garden. Ideas. Houses and gardens, and he is writing “How to Create a Garden” (this is a perfect garden design book, suitable for anyone who looks at his garden and wants to know how to transform it to reflect his own style. I am the most Favorite gardening store Medium garden Amazon store products, tools: For garden ideas, gardening advice, garden design and landscaping ideas for your garden or backyard, please subscribe to the “Medium Garden YouTube” channel here: Whether you like English gardens Style, bungalow garden or modern style urban garden, medium-sized gardens provide you with gardening advice and garden ideas. Weekly videos cover gardening advice and garden design-from small space gardens to medium-sized garden landscaping-as well as garden tours and container gardening tips. Related For garden ideas, gardening techniques and inspiration for your garden, please subscribe to the “Medium Gardens” YouTube channel here: Medium Gardens are uploaded once a week, visit private gardens and be interviewed by professional gardeners. If your garden is less than an acre, please Join us and enjoy your garden! #garden #gardening #backyard For information about small and medium backyards and gardens, see. Medium Garden Blog: For information on Amazon storefronts, see: More garden ideas on Pinterest: Twitter: Facebook:.

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19 Comments

  • The Middle-Sized Garden
    Reply

    Having interviewed some wonderful garden designers over the past five years, I wanted to pull together their best tips for saving money on garden design – so I hope you like it. And if you have any good budget-friendly garden design tips, do add them in the comments! Thank you.

  • Beulah Land Homestead Farm
    Reply

    Nope, no t as one measure in my cottage garden…I've already told my husband to keep out, this is my project…

  • Fiona Nogawa
    Reply

    Thank you for loads of great ideas presented in a very friendly and helpful way – makes it all seem doable!

  • 3lightsteps
    Reply

    Best garden channel for sound design advice I have found, other than the one I use for plants to use in my USA zone.

  • Gillian
    Reply

    Rather comforting to know that other gardeners have killed plants…. nothing ventured…on we go. I really enjoy your channel Alexandra. I feel uplifted with every episode I watch, and it gives me the will to keep going. I'm making progress with your encouraging tips and ideas. Thank you.

  • Mrinalini Srivastava
    Reply

    Wonderful informative and down-to-earth programme. Glad I have followed a lot of her principles and advice in my own garden. It was redesigned in 2009 when I bought my 1890 house. The start was to rip up the old floor concrete that was more cracks than floor, very uneven and dangerous, it was replaced in the courtyard area by lovely gavel – this is when I found out about the various grades of gravel – and their various prices! – interspersed with large slabs of York stones which make it easier to walk. The courtyard is home to a large collection of pots in different sizes and shapes, filled with roses and other plants. The furniture I found in an antique centre. It is a set of 1920 French garden furniture. A couple of coats of garage door paint every few years keep it sparkling white. The whole fence 15 panels + a gate were also beyond saving. We then turned our attention to the garden proper, overgrown and shapeless but with a beautiful mellow old brick wall at the bottom, except that you couldn’t get near it. Some years before, someone had planted a kind of conifer that had grown enormous. At some point it had been chopped off, probably hoping it would bring about its demise, instead of which it coppiced it, sending further ‘trunks’ and very large branches. This mess had grown to an incredible size, totally obliterating the view of Ely Cathedral that had sold the house to me. It took an entire day for a tree surgeon to bring it down safely!
    Once we were rid of the monstrosity we could look at the garden, what was there, what could be kept, saved, moved and then we decided on the trees. I already had a lovely apple trees, probably seventy years old which is of no identifyable lineage but is covered with large, red and delicious apples every summer. This tree became a centre piece around which the scheme was designed. Being already in my sixties at the time, I was conscious that I had to buy things of a certain size so that they would fairly quickly come to look like ‘trees’, in went a gorgeous coppiced white birch, a tall pencil-shaped Swedish birch, a Gingko. Its golden shower of leaves are a yearly delight. I could go on….
    The garden itself has an amazing number of roses, the beds and path meander, making the garden appear much bigger than it is, with my beloved ‘woodland’ bit at the bottom.
    The great joy of a garden is to see it develop over the years and change and, as the lady said, allowing it to do its own thing. Every winter, I cook up new projects and 2020 as I was shielding from Covid was no exception. I had little brick surrounds and raised beds built of reclaimed bricks to replace the original ones made of railway sleepers and this has been a great success. A few weeks ago, a wooden arch was erected leading into the woodland bit. Just had a small rambler planted at the side to cascade over it. I also acquired a large wooden trough on legs which I will fill with petunias and other annuals once the risk of frost has finally departed and dahlias for height. Right from the start I put in a daphne plant and I can imagine how wonderful it will be to have its scent next spring and all that waist high. The hyacinths create a wall of scent, even on a cold morning.
    I am about to have more lights installed and a power point so that I can enjoy the warmth of the electric heater I have just acquired – the perfect oasis to dream up new projects while enjoying a cup of coffee! The joy goes on!

  • Josh Stuchbery
    Reply

    In my new garden I had a big long concrete driveway that I didn't want. I smashed up all the concrete and used it to create a big dry stacked retaining wall in the back, which looks great!

  • Katherine Rand
    Reply

    I like the guy that said don’t be afraid to fail. You can’t control a garden! I love this because I am just starting to garden abs worry to much I might fail but just words hit home for me.

  • jane field
    Reply

    I’ve just moved and I’m planning my garden. Thank you so much for your encouragement, tips and advice!

  • carolyn ellis
    Reply

    I always look at my neighbours Gardens and am surprised that folks plant a tree and don't realise what it is nor how the height they can grow to plus root systems entangling water pipes etc.

  • smart viewer
    Reply

    It’s reassuring to hear that even the experts kill plants sometimes. The color pink looks very nice on you too by the way 🙂

  • Anna Gray
    Reply

    These were great tips. Thank you so much for sharing! ♥ In my current home I initially had to do a lot of garden paths on a very low budget. What I did was this. I used old garden hoses, which I sourced from people for free, to make the borders. I stapled hoses to the ground with wire staples. Wire staples can be bought or made out of old wire hangers. I filled the spaces with mulch and laid whatever pavers I could find. Many of them were flat old rocks and bits of concrete that I collected around the neighborhood. Parts of wooden pallets can also be used, although those do rot away eventually. Pallet boards can also be fastened to the ground with wire staples. Each path cost me $5-15. My hope is that it will help someone with a very low income, who might otherwise be discouraged from doing these projects at all. If at all possible, please make more budget tip garden videos. These are very useful. Thank you so much! ♥

  • By Millie B Photography
    Reply

    It's so rare to find a channel that actually gives new & useful tips & ideas. You are a treasure. Thank you!

  • Dotty Kallis
    Reply

    I’ve just discovered your lovely vlogs thank you, just my cup of tea! Very informative enjoyable and useful

  • OfftoShambala
    Reply

    If you have a shabby fence… rejoice! I have an old horse paddock that I look at from the house and my brother wanted to cover it up with a wood fence… but I love it! I do plan on growing around it, but I want some of it to show.

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