Landscape Design Concept of Local Botanical Gardens | Webinar

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  • Doris A
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    This video don’t show Native Plants, there are beautiful native plants gardens that would have been a great example. If you’re not promoting the use of Native plants, please don’t put native plants on the title.

  • Salvia Buckwheats
    Reply

    I hope to see webinars specifically on habitat gardening, where the plants are 99% native in the pictures and also mention is made of taking into account the needs of different life stages of the wildlife we seek to attract, for example birds, native bees and butterflies need nectar but also nesting sites and for bugs, host plants for eggs that will hatch to caterpillars. More mention of evil neonicotinoids and perhaps delve into the (potential) controversy of feeding hummingbirds (are there hummingbirds in the Midwest?) sugar water, plus spreading of bacteria and virus among birds when those feeders are not properly cleaned and sanitized. Also the damage wrought by non-native milkweed. Thanks for pointing out the evils of treated plants in killing caterpillars here. Thanks again for a great presentation.

  • Salvia Buckwheats
    Reply

    Wow, excellent presentation! Host Jamie makes excellent points in the questions and answer time, and Nancy put together a fine presentation that follows a plan, presenting design looks as well as pointing out the names of some excellent native plants. The main point of this entire garden-with-native-plants idea is to serve the planet and support its life. Nancy makes that point early on, about how, if you want birds, you must provide them with the plants that will attract their food. Nancy mentions in the questions and answer period that we must avoid pesticides entirely ideally, and I would add, especially neonicontinoids, which stay in the environment way too long and are more destructive than we know. But Nancy’s answer is perfect about how to control insects by keep planting more natives that will attract the predators. Jamie is right on about more reasons to avoid cultivars (less pollen but also shape of flower, color, season of growth all may also deter or prevent pollinators or leaf-eating insects from taking advantage of the plant. I also first heard here Jamie’s term, ‘biologically inert” referring to the zero wildlife value of non-natives. Well put. I hope to find more information on recommended books, sources of plants (a few were mentioned here), times of the year to plant, and books on rushes, grasses and sedges. I will be new to Midwest native gardening in spring 2021, as I am moving to a 20-acre homestead from a life in Southern California. So I especially enjoyed hearing about the worst non-native invasive, and some ideas as to how to treat them. Happily, this also tells me what I can do with my moving boxes. Oh, almost forgot, as I have successfully used this cardboard layer method to kill Bermuda grass here in Los Angeles: don’t forget to remove the tape!! You will either remove it now or be pulling it out of the ground later. That has been my experience here, anyway, where the climate with no rain in between March and December or January means your cardboard will decompose in 5 years, not 3 months. ; ). Indiana, here I come. Thank you, Conservation Foundation, I will look forward to donating to your wonderful organization that supports us all in our determination to help save the planet, and ourselves.

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