John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ goes on a field trip to Swank Specialty Produce to learn about their farm to table event and share with you how this commercial family farm grows…

Hydroponic & SoilLess Growing at Swank Farm and What can be Gleened from their Success

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25 Comments

  • Learn Organic Gardening at GrowingYourGreens
    Reply

    you can use clear plastic, however that may create a really moist
    enviornment. You may look into reemay which is a row cover that lets light
    and water thru but pests out. That is what farmers use.

  • Learn Organic Gardening at GrowingYourGreens
    Reply

    I personally juice a wide variety of produce on a rotation basis so that I
    won’t have any problems with too many alkaloids or other toxins. Lately I
    have been on juicing alot of chickweed. Its delicious. I encourage people
    juicing a wide variety of produce. I talk a little about it at
    watch?v=Dv-AsBuiR_8

  • Diane Mumm Garden Videos
    Reply

    I just watched a 25min video.. wowser.. very interesting farm.. thanks for
    all your hard work John..:) Diane

  • trevorpinnocky
    Reply

    that was the quickest 5min video I’ve seen in a long time. ; ) I’m planning
    to do a raised bed myself and have been investigating using gardensoxx for
    speed and convenience. They are also available as with organic compost.

  • CINTHYA KNOX
    Reply

    John, in order to cover my bed to protect from pest, do I have to use a
    certain type of cloth or can it be regular clear plastic? I want to make
    sure the plants are getting sunlight.

  • Gynoma Rei
    Reply

    @GODMANGUY6969: I’ll delve a little deeper to find out, but on the Smart
    Pots website I couldn’t find which type of fabric it used. I think it’s
    essential to know what materials you use in growing. Advising home-growers
    to use plastic might not be wise. There are numerous other options to be
    found with a very little extra work. Though it’s wonderful to encourage
    people to grow at home, plastics are a great source of dis-ease. So, it’s
    good to get other options out there.

  • Shane Holcomb
    Reply

    Excellent video. I just wanted to add a note on pollination. I grow 1 or 2
    rows of buckwheat in my garden. The buckwheat attracts bees when it blooms,
    and when I started using it my yields increased at least 30%. It is also a
    fantastic green manure crop which can be tilled in or composted. In a
    raised bed just plant a little in the corners and watch the bees come in.

  • U-leru
    Reply

    Man i just love the extensive nature of this farm and its diversity. The
    video is very informative. I never knew some of those plant leaves could be
    eaten straight off the plant. I’m still learning and really appreciate the
    effort John does to inform others of the wonders of gardening I can’t wait
    to start up on a bigger scale.

  • Gynoma Rei
    Reply

    I understand the concept and purpose of the grow bags, but I was wondering
    about chemical leaching from the plastic: How long do you think it would
    take for leaching to begin? There must be other cheap options for home
    growing that do not include plastic or other toxic products?

  • Patricia Valdez
    Reply

    I have so many bees due to the coral vine and blue salvia I grow. They both
    attract two different species. They do all my pollinating. I can’t wait to
    see how they handle the veggies this coming spring.

  • Kuromatsu619
    Reply

    John, you and Praxxus should collaborate on a video together. The both of
    you are very inspirational. Thanks for what you do!

  • GODMANGUY6969
    Reply

    @gynoma those bags aernt plastic bags, they r prolly just a durable cloth
    like material made from hemp, coconut, or vermiculite like a welders apron

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