Building and installing larger tomato cages. Visit The Bayou Gardener in Avoyelles Parish Louisiana – Cajun Country at http://www.thebayougardener.com

Big Tomato Cages – Growing a Vegetable Garden

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20 Comments

  • galaxiexl500
    Reply

    There are two types of tomato plants. Determinate and indeterminate. The determinate are considered bush type plants that grow to a determined height by variety. Usually 3 to 4 feet high. The indeterminate are really vines. They will grow as high as the support allows them. I have seen indeterminate tomato plants grow thirty feet (30) up on wires suspended from a high ceiling as an experiment. Shame on Lowes and Home Depot for selling what they call tomato cages. Use these short cages for determinate tomato and pepper plants.

  • MZ Mary
    Reply

    What's the name of the poles you used to tie the cage to? I'm a Gretna, LA girl and I think your crop netting video is by far the best in trellis systems I've seen so far !!!!

  • James Atkinson
    Reply

    I have watched many of your videos. I find them informative and enjoyable. Thank You Donald for making them

  • rick padgett
    Reply

    How do you deal with early and late blight?It is a problem for me.I trim leaves from the bottom up to not let them touch the ground.When I plant I form a round mound about a foot from the base of the plant,kinda looks like a donut.About 3 in high around the plant.Once a week I fill this area with water letting it soak in.That is all the watering I do until the next week,making sure no water gets on the plant.I also mulch with hay. 

  • rick padgett
    Reply

    This is a beautiful garden extremely well maintained.The cages he is building will last at least 10 yrs. because mine have and are still in good shape.I have never seen a better cage.

  • N.E.Arkansas Trash Trucks&Lottery
    Reply

    Last year most all of my tomatoes grew 8 to 10 foot tall easily..I need a 10 foot cage haha.

  • David Smith
    Reply

    Great information.  Those cages will last for many years.  I used hognose clips years ago instead of twisted wire when I made mine.  They are more commonly called hog rings.   They are used in a variety of applications such as upholstery.  Real easy to put on and doesn't leave the sharp edges that the twisted wire does.  Thanks for the great videos.  You're a natural born teacher.  

  • Steve Wiggins
    Reply

    hi im 58 yo  made mine like that when i was 20 and their still as good as when I made the back then. I use ever year and store outside the rest of the time

  • HECTOR MARRERO
    Reply

    Hello Webcajun, I have a question for you. I have a pumpkin plant growing very nicely. The only problem I have is that I need to move it but it has attached it self to my fence. If I remove it from the fence will it hurt the plant ?

  • David Hammon
    Reply

    Your video on the construction of tomatoes was very helpful. Last year I grew some Cherry Tomatoes that were in those cheaper store bought cages, and I was constantly trying to come up with ways to keep them from falling over. The plants reached a height of over six foot, and most of that was hanging over the cages. This year I expect bigger tomato plants, so a bigger cage will be needed. Planting time is just around the corner here in New York, so finding your video in time was a blessing. Thank you.

    So I understand this right… You take a roll of wire, cut it to a length of 6', fasten the ends together, pound a T=post into the ground and attach the cage to this in two places?

  • daniel cooper
    Reply

    Constructed your Big Tomato Cages last summer. They certainly beat the commercially made tomato cages on the market. Thank you so much!

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