Added by on 2018-04-14

What’s the best wood chip mulch to use in your vegetable garden? I answer this question in today’s video. If you shop on Amazon, you can support OYR simply by clicking this link (bookmark it too) before shopping: http://www.amazon.com/?tag=oneya-20 7 reasons why arborist wood chips are the best wood chip mulch for your vegetable garden: 0:34 they support a broad diversity of soil life and promote healthier plants 1:08 their diversity in materials and particle sizes results in less compaction compared to uniform mulches 1:32 they are large enough to remain on the soil surface 2:03 they don’t tie up nitrogen in the root zone 2:50 they break down slowly 3:27 they are local and sustainable 3:53 they are the least expensive option Source: “Using Arborist Wood Chips as Landscape Mulch” by Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott https://research.libraries.wsu.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/2376/5262/FS160E.pdf?sequence=2 I’m passionate about an approach to organic gardening that is frugal, easy, sustainable, and works with nature to achieve amazing results. My videos will help you grow more healthy organic fruits and vegetables, while working less and saving money. I don’t push gardening products. I don’t hype bogus “garden secrets”. I provide evidence based strategies to help you grow a lot of food on a little land without spending much or working harder than you have to! Related PostsWorst and Best Wood Chip Mulch for Your Vegetable GardenHow I Prepare My Vegetable Garden Beds Using Wood ChipNO TILL B2E Method Organic Vegetable Gardening Soil Building with mulch for beginners 101. Pt 6NO TILL B2E Method Organic Vegetable Gardening Soil Building with mulch for beginners 101. Pt 8NO TILL B2E Method Organic Vegetable Gardening Soil Building with mulch for beginners 101. Pt 7Using Mulch in Your Vegetable Garden

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19 Comments

  • OYR Frugal & Sustainable Organic Gardening 3 months ago

    7 reasons why arborist wood chips are the best wood chip mulch for your vegetable garden:

    0:34 they support a broad diversity of soil life and promote healthier plants
    1:08 their diversity in materials and particle sizes results in less compaction compared to uniform mulches
    1:32 they are large enough to remain on the soil surface
    2:03 they don't tie up nitrogen in the root zone
    2:50 they break down slowly
    3:27 they are local and sustainable
    3:53 they are the least expensive option

    Source:
    "Using Arborist Wood Chips as Landscape Mulch" by Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott https://research.libraries.wsu.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/2376/5262/FS160E.pdf?sequence=2

    3 Ways You Can Support OYR Without Spending an extra Penny!

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  • wendy chiu 3 months ago

    What about Raccoons?
    They tend to poop on the wood chips.
    What do you do about this problem?

  • Greenbelt Maryland 3 months ago

    Great video, Patrick! In several replies you list where you use these chips but never mention near shrubs or trees. Except for the warning to keep them from touching the trunks, any reason why they shouldn't be used in all ornamental landscaping beds?

  • Alexander Supertramp 3 months ago

    ur the man

  • Isabella & Jaidyns Garden Adventures 3 months ago

    awesome sweatshirt!! We are waiting for our wood chip delivery, its free so it will be here when it gets here haha

  • Felicia H 3 months ago

    Hi Patrick! I just sent you a copy of my soil test via Facebook messenger. I am not sure what happened with the brewery grains -they did compost. However, there was definitely something wrong -I stayed pure with only compost, no dig, no store bought, and no pesticides etc

  • Felicia H 3 months ago

    Any ideas about which compost is better to grow in? I use a mix of leaves, vegetable and fruit waste, brewery grains but was not successful last year. Soil test said I was lacking nitrogen so I trying cover crops. Charles dowsing uses old horse manure. What are your thoughts?

  • Walter Blackledge 3 months ago

    A pitch fork works SO much better than a spade type shovel for mulch/chips, etc.

  • Jason Kinsfather 3 months ago

    Love the winter sweatshirt Patrick. I hope Oscar got some catnip mice for Christmas.

  • Lamprine Datsika 3 months ago

    Good Morning Patrick. Thank you very much!

  • ud1976 3 months ago

    Great information. Thanks! Do you have any idea about how to get rid of quack-grass, organically? I've been battling it for 3 years now. Up here in Seattle it seems to grow back, underground, in winter.

  • Highland's Giving Garden 3 months ago

    I live in California which has lots of palm trees. I've been told NOT to put palm mulch in our community garden. Why is that? I've been told the same thing about eucalyptus as well.

  • Duncan Crow 3 months ago

    I gather and shred baby Red Alder trees green, leaves and all, so there's little nitrogen draw, and compost the mulch for a few months before spreading or digging them in. A friend mentioned shredded ramial wood and I found a lot of science about it and in French bois raméal fragmenté. Takehome point is that green hardwood can rot fast and not draw much nitrogen because the lignin is still unseasoned. That is, if the wood and bark are still green the ramial wood appeals to a different range of composters, especially mushrooms, earthworms and generally a humic soil environment. I use a Mackissic SC800 hammer mill shredder and it comes out about perfect with the stock 1" screen. Research I read found that if some of the material comes through shredded a bit lengthwise and not always chopped to a uniform cube so to speak, the desirable mycelia spreads faster.

  • cimwandaful 3 months ago

    Thanks for this video! I've been collecting wood chips from a local arborist dumping site. I've been concerned because the chips are of vastly differing sizes and several different types of wood. Also included are stems and leaves. Now I can rest easy since watching this tutorial on wood chips! Thanks! I do have a problem though. My neighbors dogs have been digging around my blueberry plants and other berries. I'm concerned that some of the wood chips have gotten mixed in with the root zone of the blueberries. If that is the case, what do you suggest I do to mitigate a depletion of the nitrogen around them?

  • Lamprine Datsika 3 months ago

    Patrick please tell me, if you know, the biochar is good for the garden;

  • Anu Janakiraman 3 months ago

    Are woodchips beneficial to add to raised beds for planting annual veggies like tomatoes, okra, cucumber etc?
    We plan to cut down an old white oak tree in the summer and get woodchips, so I can get a good mix of green and brown from it.
    Plan is to add compost, and top off the raised beds with woodchips – about 4 inches next fall. Like Back to Eden method. What are your thoughts?

  • Michele Jones 3 months ago

    In vd's ur putting chips in pathways. Do u put them in the actual raised beds? I don't remember seeing that in ur vd's!

  • Inger Haugland 3 months ago

    Great video 😀 I recently got my very first little load of wood chips, as we had an arborist chop down a big tree that was getting a bit dangerous. Super happy about it! And as they're in a big pile they're composting and even melting the snow on top. It's so fascinating I think.
    I'm looking for a video of yours, maybe you know which one it is? I've rewatched all your videos with garlic in the title (or all I could find at least), but I just can't find the one where you explain how it works that you can't develop a variety of garlic by just selecting the biggest cloves from the biggest bulbs and plant those. Maybe what I'm looking for was just a segment in another video? If you remember I'd love to know! But of course if you don't that's all right! Happy holidays Patrick, and a joyful relaxing time to you and your family. 🙂

  • I think one thing not mentioned about fresh arborist woodchips, is that they are a store of water. A recently felled tree is 50% water:

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5269813.pdf

    Surface exposed chips are dry yes, but when digging into a fresh pile of arborist(ramial) wood chips, it's usually moist. This moisture is then consumed and stored in the thermodynamically downhill biochemical reactions with life formation of microbes and fungus. Through evaporation and biorespiration eventually it does dry out if there is no input of additional water. But then you'll have dormant fungal and microbial elements extravasated throughout the woodchip media just waiting for a rain to ignite a new round of wonderous soil life activity.