Added by on 2016-05-12

CLF teamed up with the Video and Film Arts Department at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) to produce Out to Pasture: The Future of Farming? films in 2010, which explore important issues in our food system. CLF and MICA also collaborated to produce a film about sustainable food animal production entitled Out to Pasture: The Future of Farming? (34 minutes) CLF’s Leo Horrigan plays the role of producer for Out to Pasture and Allen Moore, a MICA professor and independent filmmaker, directs the film. Out to Pasture contrasts industrial-style confined animal production with farms that raise food animals outdoors in diversified operations, striving to be sustainable. Several of these pasture-based farmers are profiled and they tell their own vibrant stories of bucking the trends in farming. They discuss how they got started in farming (three transitioned from confinement operations), what’s important about their farming methods, how their conventional-farm neighbors view them, how to keep young people on the farm, the future of the food system, and other compelling topics. The film also features Robert Lawrence, director of CLF; and John Ikerd, a leading thinker on sustainable agriculture issues. http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-a-livable-future/news_events/multimedia/out_of_pastore.html Video Rating: / 5 Session 2: Big Data and the Internet of Agricultural Things The Soil, Big Data and the Future of Agriculture conference explored the rapid advances in big data analytics in agriculture and delved into a range of issues foremost in the minds of farmers as they consider the future, including farm data privacy and security, and remote and rural access to broadband capacity. The conference was held in Canberra, Australia on 25 June 2015. Session 2 Big data, the Internet of Agricultural Things, digital agriculture – they are here, but it is not necessarily clear what it all means and how Australian farmers and graziers can […]

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20 Comments

  • Yonela Jafta 1 year ago

    Sustainable Agriculture is the future of farming!!!

  • Annie Jefferson 1 year ago

    gorgeous

  • Himself Lee 1 year ago

    More and more people are returning to the way their grandparents farmed. We were all eating organically back then, but just did not know it. We are dairy farmers and our cows eat only grass and hay. A well-bred, well cared for cow, can still produce 40-50 pounds per milk per day during her lactation. They do not need grain. They get adequate carbs and proteins from quality grass and hair.

  • International1066 1 year ago

    And that's another problem, modern dairy cow breeds need grain or they'll die, if you can breed a cow that can live well on just grass, that will be a good breakthrough

  • International1066 1 year ago

    i grew up on a 30 cow dairy, when i turned 17 i went to work on an industrial size dairy, and i immediately could see that cows in confinement are not happy, nothing puts a truer smile on my face than when the cows follow me out to the far gate, then i open it and they run and kick and play like you wouldn't believe, it's beautiful

  • Steve Parker 1 year ago

    Wonderfully heartwarming!

  • Podzy 1 year ago

    I don't know how I feel about this> I mean, certainly organics and small scale farming is better than conventional livestock. But what about verses a vegetable farm? When I look at a grazing land all I see is the opportunity for there to be a forest and real biodiversity. I think we should scrap animal agriculture.

  • Gary Johnson 1 year ago

    I agree, small farms but more of them is the future. but even the cities and towns need to transform everyone helping to grow or manage the animals. people must learn to be sustainable farmers again. good documentary

  • Cathy Lespearnce 1 year ago

    oh I forgot about feeding the homeless, or hiring chiefs

  • Cathy Lespearnce 1 year ago

    I was going to build a business like this; Then gather homeless people to help me, so I don't have to pay for others lol! but it look so complicated, must be a billions of dollars to raise a big field, n not very much experience with a big huge farm anyway; if I did hire homeless ppl. I have 2 build, shelter for them, pick n choose who I hire, get security people for my protection, & maybe pay for for someone to teach them how to plant, feed & all of that, & if I did live there, I would rather move, because I don't want those homeless people, to come to my house and steal, break, disturb me, etc. & it's hard for me to tell them what to do because I'm tiny & small, but anyways I like what I'm watching, thanks for sharing this video

  • Cathy Lespearnce 1 year ago

    I was going to build a business like this; Then gather homeless people to help me, so I don't have to pay for others lol! but it look so complicated, must be a billions of dollars to raise a big field, n not very much experience with a big huge farm anyway; if I did hire homeless ppl. I have 2 build, shelter for them, pick n choose who I hire, get security people for my protection, & maybe pay for for someone to teach them how to plant, feed & all of that, & if I did live there, I would rather move, because I don't want those homeless people, to come to my house and steal, break, disturb me, etc. & it's hard for me to tell them what to do because I'm tiny & small, but anyways I like what I'm watching, thanks for sharing this video

  • Jim Barb 1 year ago

    Damn I liked to crapped watching this that Jeremiah Jones I bought hogs from him when I was living on my land in beaulaville NC and David Whitman was in the hunting club that hunted the surrounding land and my farm too.

  • Ian Sarault 1 year ago

    Interested in more, look up Joel Salatin.

  • Robert S 1 year ago

    How about this; we all get 10 acres; those who don't want to don't have to, but then we can all become self-sustianed and then we can sell our surpluses! I love this idea, but I think everyone else will hate it!

  • tom jackson 1 year ago

    At 12:40 "Grass roots people voting with their food dollars every day". Mr. Kim Seeley is also a political prophet as well as a farmer. He describes the most powerful tool of the American people to set this country right. Let's do it !

  • delsurf71 1 year ago

    Great video. As a person who does not have a multi-generation small farm to take over but dreams of a life commitment like this; what resources are out there to get started? I am close to middle aged, have a family, am a few years into my 2nd career and live in a mostly urban environment. With my little piece of ground I grow a garden and compost my vegetable waste either in backyard composters or with my basement vermicompost set-up. I would gladly trade this for a situation like any of these farms. I know I could do it if I had a successful plan to get started and it isn't some crazy idea that would hurt my family.

    If there are those resources that anyone knows of please pass it along.

    Again, great video.

  • Chilcote Forestry 1 year ago

    dumb question – how do you feed pasture cows through the winter? Do you hay part of the acreage?

  • Chilcote Forestry 1 year ago

    I could use all that manure to help with restoring poor soils in forests and old fields.

  • Jared Lamoreaux 1 year ago

    So I live in Utah and am very interested in getting back to my farming heritage. Any advice or resources that I can leverage here in the west?

  • Franklin Michael 1 year ago

    32:01 spot on, we need to consume less quantity of better quality food, which is more nutrient rich even though it's less quantity, we should also eat more vegetables and less grains.