Added by on 2016-04-11

In the first video of my series for beginning gardeners, I talk about the best location for a vegetable garden. These are the factors to consider when choosing a location for a vegetable garden: 1) Look for a location that gets 6 to 8 hours of direct sun. 2) Avoid locations where soil is likely contaminated, especially if growing in native soil. If in doubt, have the soil tested for contaminants. It’s also a good idea to test the soil fro nutrients, organic matter, and pH. This can save a lot of time, money, and guesswork in the future. 3) Locate the garden close to the house and a water source. 4) A south facing slope is advantageous in cooler climates with a short growing season. 5) Look for a location that is protected from extreme winds and pests by fences, trees, or buildings. 6) Make sure you are aware of any limitations on vegetable gardens imposed by your municipality or homeowner association. Featured Videos: Growing Food in Partial Shade: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNsECuNTSQY How to Build a Raised Bed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VptBIJ_Y-o One Yard Revolution is all about growing a lot of food on a little land using sustainable organic methods, while keeping costs and labor at a minimum. Emphasis is placed on improving soil quality with compost, mulch, and compost tea. No store-bought fertilizers, soil amendments, pesticides, compost activators, etc. are used. Channel Page: http://www.youtube.com/user/OneYardRevolution Join me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oneyardrevolution Video Rating: / 5 Related PostsGreen Revolution Series: Green RoofsSmall space vegetable gardening – A series about maximizing your space effectivelyKitchen Gardening Overview | Beginning Vegetable Gardening June-2016 (Urdu/hindi)Kitchen Gardening Overview | Beginning Vegetable Gardening August-2016 (Urdu/hindi)Kitchen Gardening Overview | Beginning Vegetable Gardening September-2016 (Urdu/hindi)The Beginning | Spring Vegetable Garden

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

 

17 Comments

  • Phell Vistal 1 year ago

    wow look her garden so beautifull!!! amazing!!

  • Barry Weigle 1 year ago

    hey Patrick,
    New to your channel what seed company do you use I'm from northeast ohio .
    thanks again for a great channel

  • Michael Ball 1 year ago

    Nice one Patrick! I've been researching pineapple cultivation in Britain and, before you laugh, you may like to take a look at the link below. In particular the reference to the fermentation of oak bark in the third paragraph of the section entitled "Structures designed for pineapple growing." I sometimes wonder if I'm more interested in making compost than growing plants themselves.

  • ahlamns 1 year ago

    Very informative. Nice first video. =)

  • Billdo O'Reilly 1 year ago

    I'm guessing you're getting tons of rain too! Are you taking any special steps to deal with the excessive amounts of rainfall? I've been cutting the yellowing bottom leaves off of my tomatoes and spraying them down with a baking soda/soap solution (on the rare days that it's not raining) but I don't know if it's helping any. Your garden looks awesome as usual.

  • Anna Tennis 1 year ago

    I'M SO GLAD YOU'RE DOING THIS SERIES!!! :D

  • Nell McCoin 1 year ago

    What kind of plants do you have on the video. The dark leafy vegetables are something I've never seen.

  • Brad Chu 1 year ago

    I used suncalc.net to get an idea sun/shade before I placed my raised beds.  It's a really useful tool.

  • Alison B 1 year ago

    If your neighbours, whether immediately adjacent to you or not, are depriving you of light to your property I should have thought you would be entitled to require the offenders to cut back their trees, and particularly when the deprivation of light is having real and significant consequences for the purpose to which you put your back garden. Of course, it may depend on the legislation governing your area. While I am not particularly familiar with your Constitution, I should have thought that a right to light is your constitutional right, and in which event any local law purporting to void such right would be unconstitutional.  It would be worth your while to check the matter out with a lawyer. Avoid any legal cost by asking an acquaintance lawyer, or through a friend who is a friend of a lawyer, or try a free legal advice centre – if you have such facilities in the U.S.! Or you could Google your Constitution and right to light cases. Our laws are much simpler here (Ireland) as we are not governed by all sorts of different federal, state and local laws. We have legislation and case law based on our Constitution. If we think there is something unconstitutional with a piece of legislation, or process, we challenge it.

  • Jim S 1 year ago

    I hope that every new gardener searching for info finds you channel early in their quest. Such practical info that a the novice or the expert can learn from.
    Thanks for sharing.
    #garden   #gardening    #gardeningtips   #gardendesign   #gardeningideas   #growing   #growyourown

  • Alison B 1 year ago

    I know NOTHING about gardening but would like to start off by growing vegetables so I am very much looking forward to following your series for beginners. As regards the shade being cast in part of your garden by neighbouring trees, do you not have any legislation where you are governing such matters which would entitle you to request the tree owners to cut back their trees on the basis that they are depriving part of your garden of light? This is a right that people have in other countries. As regards homeowners associations, the homeowners should be able to vote to change the management company, and thereafter the rules governing what they can and cannot do, particularly if they do not like the original rules imposed by the developer who then formed the management company. Also, I have heard that in some States in the U.S. there are even local councils which prohibit homeowners from erecting solar panels, and oblige them to use a particular electricity supplier. This seems crazy to me, particularly in this age of conservation and the use of more productive and sustainable processes.

  • MrMac5150 1 year ago

    Mr Pat, I wanted you to check out this guys method on gardening
    Let me know what you think,  and if it is for real
    Back to Eden  by – Paul  Gautschi
    Youtube Channel Name is –  L2Survive

    Its seems so unbelievable to do this garden with no watering.
    I would like to here your professional feed back.

  • hevnbown 1 year ago

    Thanks for your videos. I noticed you had dinosaur kale growing. I tried to grow some last year but between the loopers, japenese beetle and slugs I was unable to harvest ANY. I used about everything people recommended but nothing stopped them and they didn't grow well at all. Are you going to go over how you put the soil you use together?

  • MonJardinAuCanada 1 year ago

    Great video, the only thing I miss when I build my garden last year it s close to water source… You are right, not easy to watering my garden. Ty

  • Red Deer 1 year ago

    Absolutely crazy that you need a permit for having a vegetable garden in the US. Didn't people protest when this first came out? How on earth is that acceptable?? You own the land, a vegetable garden is likely not causing HARM to any of the neighbours…. It should be your right to grow whatever you wish in your front/backyard. It's private property for a reason. Unbelievable.

  • Eco Oasis 1 year ago

    Wow Patrick! Your garden is looking amazing! Where are you located…Costa Rica?(-:Thanks for the tips on the best location for a vegetable garden. I look forward to watching your new video series for beginning gardeners.