Added by on 2016-06-24

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com visits Swank Farm in South Florida. Swank Specialty Produce grows over 200 varieties of crops that you can buy. From tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplant, beans, pease and more, join John on this “insiders” view of this commercial hydroponic farm and see how a family-owned farm grows food to feed thousands of people. Video Rating: / 5 Related PostsHydroponic & SoilLess Growing at Swank Farm and What can be Gleened from their SuccessGrowing Strawberries Vertically and Hydroponically. Also Commercial Farm TourHydroponic Farm VisitHydroponic Farm Grows 350 Varieties of Vegetables with 90 minerals to Grow the best tasting foodGrowing Cucumbers Vertically Compared to on the GroundEcho Visit Growing in Raised Beds on concrete Roofs and Urban Gardening in Tropical Areas

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20 Comments

  • Jazmin Alvarado 1 year ago

    Can not hear what the farmer is saying!

  • Stephen Richards 1 year ago

    Hey, I grow lettuces and other green leafy on my small hydroponics farm here at Lake MacDonald, Queensland, Australia and unknowing I am doing almost exactly the same as you. We are open to the elements, not in a greenhouse, but this is so awesome to see

  • alphasxsignal 1 year ago

    What does he do when a storm comes with high winds, looks like he is in Florida where Im
    located. I have the room for something like this. I have 6 acres but worry about high winds
    with a structure like this. I guess he doesn't do much in the winter.

  • Piluttatingeling 1 year ago

    To have a hydroponic production cerfied organic where I live, one has to use non-inert substrates. Maybe that's why they aren't certified ?

  • Troy Brownrigg 1 year ago

    I own 55 acres sitting on Arizona's largest water table. Look for investors to help develop it. It use to be Alfalfa fields.

  • bulleuston76 1 year ago

    Would have been better knowing more about his 'organic' nutrients.

  • shannonstudio 1 year ago

    Thank you for the excellent video! I am new to West Palm Beach & am going to buy this produce soon!! 

  • Baum Olive J. 1 year ago

    Thank you for the video.
    I also have the thorough step-by-step training video directions on the way to make your very own homemade Aquaponic system. Its really easy that even your grandma can do it!
    Check out here to learn more:
    www.fine4.info/step-by-step-how-to-build-your-own-aquaponics-system

  • pheaktra ponlok 1 year ago

    Very nice, now my family in Cambodia just want to try like you guy. Thank you for sharing.

  • vespabones 1 year ago

    Most hydroponic growers use synthetic or chemical fertilizer. Using organic fertilizer or nutrients usually causes problems with hydroponics. All natural fertilizers are usually nutrients from natural (non-chemical) sources but are not certified as organic. There are a lot of pesticides and fungicides on the market that are organic. Knowledge is power, keep growing and hopefully organically.

  • justgivemethetruth 1 year ago

    Wow, that is really impressive. Very beautiful operation.
    What do you do when you are hit with a hurricane?

  • Dylan A. Kent 1 year ago

    What a great video! John, even though some of these guys have dream setups, you are doing OUTSTANDING work by bringing all this information to us. I can't have a garden right now but I'm studying all your videos and I totally intend to make use of this great knowledge. Thank you so much!

  • hunterloren2323 1 year ago

    Nice set up! I have been thinking of operating an NFT system similar to this commercially in VA. Where did you purchase the rail system, or what brand is it? Also wondering if you use the same nutrient solution for all the different plants, or do you have separate systems different banks of rails? Thanks and glad to see you have done well for you self here!

  • trexmobile1 1 year ago

    do u think u could use butterflys instead of bees?

  • boxa888 1 year ago

    @growingyourgreens man your the best! great work! thank you!

  • fatwadmcskylar 1 year ago

    do the bees have to be within the greenhouse zone to pollinate all the plants? i would prefer to have hives out in the yard somewhere away from me, and they would (hopefully) travel to the greenhouse and do the work for me. The last thing i want is to swallow another bee in my beer while im enjoying the day

  • fatwadmcskylar 1 year ago

    @growingyourgreens you should try out just a tiny one feeding a few plants and see how you like it, it seems pretty simple, just the costs of keeping the water warm, but the warmed fish tanks double as heating for your greenhouse. Duckweed and whatnot can be grown as a free fish food to remove that cost as well

  • Natalie B 1 year ago

    guy on the right needs a better mic. The video would have been much better. nice operations and information though.

  • Learn Organic Gardening at GrowingYourGreens 1 year ago

    There is no legal defninition of "natural". Just because your hydroponic doesn't meant you dont use pesticides. Normal hydroponic growers may use pesticides, fungicides, etc.

  • Yucca Oldoitter (madeofyucca) 1 year ago

    Also, what makes this "natural" as opposed to other hydroponic operations? (I am very interested in the topic)